How to Be a Personal Chef

personal-chef-in-kitchen-vertThe role of personal chef was virtually unknown a few years ago. Today more than 7,000 are registered as active members of the American Personal Chef Association. Industry leaders estimate this number will swell to more than 25,000 within the next 10 years. They will be serving nearly 300,000 clients and contributing nearly $1.2 billion to the U.S. economy.

A personal chef plans menus, shops for food, and cooks it in a client’s home. He may pack it in neatly labeled containers with heating directions, store it in the refrigerator or freezer and, then leave the kitchen in pristine condition. He or she customarily is employed by several clients. Read on…

Food Jobs 2 is #1 on Amazon Today!

Food Jobs 2 received #1 ranking in all categories today: Job Hunting, Cookbooks, Food & Wine, Essays, Career Development. All for less than the cost of sandwich!

Great Food Jobs 2

Reviews

“Witty, inspiring and full of new ideas, this companion book to Food Jobs will give you exciting ways to think about jobs. Chalmers gives new meaning to “thinking out of the box,” and fills the book with clever stories and lessons. Buy it if you already own the previous Food Jobs, as there’s all new information here — Dianne Jacob, author, Will Write for Food

Irena Chalmers knows more about the subject of working in the food world than any of the dozens of other experts we know. Read on…

Radio Host Food Job

Being the host of a food-focused radio show must surely be among the most desirable of careers for anyone knowledgeable about food. If you would love to have your own radio program, this is how to get started.
Address a proposal to the radio-station manager in which you describe your idea in one short paragraph. For inspiration consider Food and Drink Magazine, a lively weekly radio program that celebrates the joys of food and drink. Late-breaking culinary news is heard there first, along with interviews and fascinating reports on the American food chain—the voyage of food from farm, to store, to skillet, to the plate.
Bullet points are always good to use in proposals. Using Food and Drink Magazine again as an example, if you were pitching that show, you might characterize it in the following manner:
• Food and Drink Magazine is modeled on the ideal buffet reception. It is a fast-paced buffet party where the talk is fascinating, the food is fabulous, and the punch carries a terrific wallop.
• The best-known and least-known small-scale food artisans, wine and beer makers, and connoisseurs are invited to present their opinions through tightly focused interviews and personal commentary.
• Listeners will meet cookbook authors, food-business entrepreneurs, chefs, restaurateurs, food-truck owners, farmers, physicians, nutritionists, food-safety regulators, beekeepers, bread bakers, and critics.
• On the menu, too, are those responsible for feeding school children, hospital patients, the military, astronauts, and those working in the kitchens of federal prisons, museums, zoos, and as the caterers of grand parties.
• When our guests can’t come to talk to us, we will go to them, even if the journey takes us to the galley of the Queen Mary 2 or to the White House.
• The subject matter of Food and Drink Magazine is the stuff of life. Food fads will be explored; food trends will be tracked. There will be reports on the latest supermarket innovations, on new apps and restaurant openings.
• The show will serve an audience hungry for information about food and the food market: what is in season—what is available at which supermarket, specialty food-store, or mail-order catalog?
• Listeners will learn about the latest scientific findings concerning nutrition and agriculture.

Suggested show format, with additional time to be allotted for commercial messages:
1. Message from the host/teasers/food news 4:00
2. Interview/produced story (major topic of the week) 3:30
3. Quiz question 0:20
4. Interview/commentary/produced story 2:00
5. New product review 2:00
6. Cookbook review 2:30
7. Person-of-the-week profile 2:00
8. Wine/beer segment 2:30
9. Supermarket news 2:00
10. The fresh report 2:30
11. Interview with person of the week 4:00
12. Listener mail with responses from an expert 2:00
13. Nutrition news 2:00
14. Closing commentary 1:30

You will be taken seriously if you provide this kind of detailed proposal. Remember as well, that some universities have their own radio stations. This may offer an opening for you too.

Food Job: Ice Cube Carver

Gläce Luxury Ice is a meticulously designed and differentiated ice brand specifically designed for use in premium drinks and cocktails. The Gläce Mariko Sphere is a perfectly spherical 2.5-inch piece with a melting rate of 20-30 minutes. The Gläce G-Cubed, a symmetrical 2.5-inch cube, has a dilution rate of 20-40 minutes. Gläce Ice pieces are individually carved from a 300-lb. block to ensure flawless quality and a zero-taste profile, never contaminating the essence of premium liquors and drinks.”

 

They’ve been featured in drinks at Playboy parties, the Pebble Beach Concourse d’Elegance, and “uber-lux” car shows, and are now part of Sysco’s restaurant distribution chain. The company maintains that the true power of their cubes lies in “tastelessness.”

 

Stephen Colbert agrees. “When you spend 75 dollars for a bag of hand-carved ice,” the host told a studio audience, “that is totally tasteless…it’s conspicuous consumption: an hour later you’re literally pissing your money away.”

This post was written by Zachary Crockett Follow him on Twitter here

Prayer for New Diet

I dare not taste one drop of  oil

For if I do, my health I’ll spoil

I’d spread my bread with gobs of butter

But that would set my doc aflutter.

Don’t serve me poultry, pork or beef

Or I will surely come to grief,

            And that fine fish just from the sea

            Would, fried, become the death of me.

 At breakfast I must never poke

My fork at any golden yolk,

            And salt, to which I was a slave

             Now lures me to an early grave.

            Sugar, friend of childhood, sweet,

            Is now a rare, forbidden treat.

A shot of gin, a glass of wine,

Add up to sins times nine,

            For Julia is no more my guide

            ‘Tis to the Pyramid’s rules I must abide

Farewell to all the eats I love

Farewell, so long, to all the above.

             But as I chomp through fields of green

            And shrink each day to sinewy lean,

                        Teach me, dear Lord,

                                    Not to wish each course

                                                Was rare roast beef

                                                    With béarnaise sauce

 

Surprise Food Job: Food Myth Buster

“Imagine that you have been washed up on a desert island. There is fresh water available, but you can have only two other foods.” Paul Rozin, professor of psychology at The University of Pennsylvania, asked the following: “From this list, which would keep you going until help arrives: corn, alfalfa sprouts, hot dogs, spinach, peaches, bananas, or milk chocolate?”

The correct answer is hot dogs and milk chocolate. They come closest to providing a diet of survival.”

The researcher Anna Frost explains:

“While they may not be the best everyday diet in normal life, hot dogs and milk chocolate both contain fat, protein, and, in the case of the hot dogs, a better amino acid balance, which give a human sufficient nutrition to survive for a year. Foods like bananas and peaches lack these precious nutrients: they are primarily composed of carbohydrates, water, vitamins, and minerals, and constitute only part of a complete diet. The point of this question is not to prepare people to reenact Gilligan’s Island with a year’s supply of Hebrew National [hot dogs], but instead to consider how we stereotype foods as “good” or “bad.”

Food Job: Myth Buster