Sustainable Cuisine

Food is the common thread that unites us all. It is love made tangible.

No matter what our physical surroundings or our religious and cultural beliefs, we all have many things in common. We all experience the emotions of sorrow and joy, rage and repentance, love and hate, fear and, occasionally, courage.  And everywhere, throughout every part of the world, we gather together to eat and drink at the end of the day. It is this sharing of food that defines us as family and unites us as members of the human family. Continue reading

Recipe for Success: Soup Peddler

David J. Ansel, The Soup Peddler

David J. Ansel, The Soup Peddler

David J. Ansel, the Soup Peddler, wrote this inspirational story for my first Food Jobs book. I loved it then, and think of him whenever I make a pot of soup.

“A scant three years and four months ago, an idea occurred to me whilst sitting on a porch swing at a magical house in South Austin, Texas. What if I could make a living cooking food and taking it to people’s homes? At my wits end with trying to figure out anything I could do for a living instead of being a mediocre computer programmer, I figured it was worth a try. Continue reading

Great Food Jobs 2 A Winner

Gourmand AwardI just received the astonishing news that Great Food Jobs 2: Ideas & Inspirations for Your Job Hunt has received the 2013 Gourmand Special Award of the Jury, having competed with books from countries all over the world in the category of Careers and Vocational Guidance for Food Professionals. It is currently shortlisted in the Gourmand Best Book in the World for Food Professionals Award too!

Great Food Jobs 2 can best be described as an almanac of eminently useful career guidance mixed with tasty bites of utterly useless gastronomical nonsense, including weird sushi combinations and odd bakery names such as “Nice Buns.”

It is a companion to Food Jobs: Great Jobs for Culinary Students, Career Changers and Food Lovers. Both publications should be viewed as complementary but completely separate from each other. Great Food Jobs 2’s content is entirely new and original.

I wrote my first single subject cookbook in 1969. It contained only 48 pages. The retail price way back then was $1.50. Today, the Kindle version of Great Food Job 2 is $7.69 for 355 pages or $17.95 if you prefer to clasp the book in your hands.

It’s taken all this time for me to realize I’m still writing single subject books whether in the form of A-Z Almanacs or A-Z Ideas and Inspirations for Culinary Careers.

Great Food Jobs 2 was written to inform and entertain, to give as a gift to a food job seeker or job seeker in general.

I most sincerely hope you will pick it up, read it and review it. It is my life’s work.

Cordially,
Irena

Visions of Becoming a Food Entrepreneur

As the holidays approach, many will turn to the kitchen for their gift inspiration. They’ll check their favorite recipes, pull out ingredients for preparing and packaging tasty delicacies to give to loved ones and colleagues, even to the friendly mail carrier and newspaper delivery ladies. As they wait for the goodies to emerge from the oven, their minds may begin to wander, to consider what it would be like to quit the day job and have a dream food job as a food entrepreneur.

Getting Started Continue reading

What to Give a Veteran for Veteran’s Day

A job would be nice.

A food job would be even nicer.

Many men and women who have served in the military have already worked in restaurants and have determined that an in-depth education from a cooking school will advance their careers.

What all aspiring food enthusiasts share is a passion for food, (though not necessarily for cooking).

Veterans may have valuable work experience already. But to succeed in today’s rapidly changing foodservice industry, they need the “complete package”—proven knowledge, skills, experience, and the all-important degree credential.

Note to Vets Continue reading

No Bad Apples

No Bad AppleOne myth after another is exploded.

Now we’re told there is no basis whatever for supposing that the fruit Eve offered to Adam in that faraway garden was an apple.

The Biblical account describes the tree simply as “good for food and pleasant to the eyes, and a tree to be desired to make one wise.”

Archeological evidence persuades us that the apple was quite unknown in the Middle East at the time we believe Genesis to have been written.

It is suggested that the identification with the apple happened much, much later, when Christian missionaries brought the story of Adam and Eve to Teutonic tribesmen who worshiped an earth mother goddess. They instantly assumed that the tree of knowledge bore apples because the goddess’s symbol was an apple, signifying love, knowledge, and immortality–and perhaps giving rise to thinking ‘an apple a day really will keep the doctor away‘? Continue reading