Radio Host Food Job

Being the host of a food-focused radio show must surely be among the most desirable of careers for anyone knowledgeable about food. If you would love to have your own radio program, this is how to get started.
Address a proposal to the radio-station manager in which you describe your idea in one short paragraph. For inspiration consider Food and Drink Magazine, a lively weekly radio program that celebrates the joys of food and drink. Late-breaking culinary news is heard there first, along with interviews and fascinating reports on the American food chain—the voyage of food from farm, to store, to skillet, to the plate.
Bullet points are always good to use in proposals. Using Food and Drink Magazine again as an example, if you were pitching that show, you might characterize it in the following manner:
• Food and Drink Magazine is modeled on the ideal buffet reception. It is a fast-paced buffet party where the talk is fascinating, the food is fabulous, and the punch carries a terrific wallop.
• The best-known and least-known small-scale food artisans, wine and beer makers, and connoisseurs are invited to present their opinions through tightly focused interviews and personal commentary.
• Listeners will meet cookbook authors, food-business entrepreneurs, chefs, restaurateurs, food-truck owners, farmers, physicians, nutritionists, food-safety regulators, beekeepers, bread bakers, and critics.
• On the menu, too, are those responsible for feeding school children, hospital patients, the military, astronauts, and those working in the kitchens of federal prisons, museums, zoos, and as the caterers of grand parties.
• When our guests can’t come to talk to us, we will go to them, even if the journey takes us to the galley of the Queen Mary 2 or to the White House.
• The subject matter of Food and Drink Magazine is the stuff of life. Food fads will be explored; food trends will be tracked. There will be reports on the latest supermarket innovations, on new apps and restaurant openings.
• The show will serve an audience hungry for information about food and the food market: what is in season—what is available at which supermarket, specialty food-store, or mail-order catalog?
• Listeners will learn about the latest scientific findings concerning nutrition and agriculture.

Suggested show format, with additional time to be allotted for commercial messages:
1. Message from the host/teasers/food news 4:00
2. Interview/produced story (major topic of the week) 3:30
3. Quiz question 0:20
4. Interview/commentary/produced story 2:00
5. New product review 2:00
6. Cookbook review 2:30
7. Person-of-the-week profile 2:00
8. Wine/beer segment 2:30
9. Supermarket news 2:00
10. The fresh report 2:30
11. Interview with person of the week 4:00
12. Listener mail with responses from an expert 2:00
13. Nutrition news 2:00
14. Closing commentary 1:30

You will be taken seriously if you provide this kind of detailed proposal. Remember as well, that some universities have their own radio stations. This may offer an opening for you too.